kidsTeam members committed to a strong future for Toyota in Canada know that having a union in the plants will only help strengthen the company.

That’s because having a union gives you a voice in the workplace, and a chance to raise concerns or bring up new ideas that could help the company, without fear of retaliation and with the confidence that your voice will be heard.

That is needed at Toyota, says Ken Sullivan, a 23-year team member at the Cambridge South plant. He liked the recent survey about the 10-hour shift, and says a union would ensure such input from team members becomes a regular thing at Toyota.

“Once that survey/vote was over, so was our collective voice,” Sullivan says. “Votes and surveys that mean anything are rare around here. Rather it’s usually a communication regarding a change already decided.”

With a union and collective agreement, team members would elect representatives from among themselves to bargain the terms of employment and to meet regularly with the company to discuss ongoing issues.

”Instead of one survey on shift structure, we could have a voice on any and all issues we think are relevant.”

And when problems arise, team members can bring a union representative with them to meet with management. You’d never have to go in alone again.

“We all know smart co-workers who we could elect, who we know would act in the best interests of everyone,” Sullivan said. “These co-workers could make up the bargaining committee to look at the results of everyone’s surveys and bargain on our behalf.”

Sullivan said this is not a break from Toyota tradition, but an expansion of its best parts.

“Instead of one survey on shift structure, we could have a voice on any and all issues we think are relevant.”